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TODAY'S OTHER NEWS

Brexit blues mean it's becoming a buyer's market, warns Rightmove

The price of property coming to market fell by 0.2 per cent or an average of £656 in the past month says Rightmove - the first fall so far this year.

The portal says that while prices are traditionally weaker in the second half of the year, this year also sees the highest total stock per estate agency branch since 2015. 

With continuing political uncertainty Rightmove says it expects buyers in sectors where there is an over-supply to have a stronger hand negotiating lower prices in the coming months. 

Miles Shipside, Rightmove director and housing market analyst says: “The housing market fundamentals remain largely sound in many parts of the country, but the current political climate means that the crucial ingredient of confidence has been impaired, and that is causing some potential buyers and sellers to hesitate. 

“With record employment, low interest rates and good mortgage availability, buyers have a lot in their favour apart from the lack of political certainty. Those who have postponed their purchase should note that estate agency branches have more sellers on their books than at any time for the last four years, so there should be more choice of properties to buy. 

“It could be a good opportunity to negotiate a relative bargain in the second half of the year, if they can set aside the continuing Brexit distractions.”

Rightmove says there are fewer properties are coming to market, down by 7.8 per cent this month compared with the same period a year ago.

In addition, fewer sales are being agreed (down by 4.6 per cent in the year-to-date compared to the same period last year) and estate agents’ total average stock per branch is higher than at any time in the last four years. 

Average stock is now running at 53.3 properties, the highest number since the 54.0 that was recorded in July 2015. 

In addition, the average time to secure a buyer is at 62 days, the highest at this time of year since 2013. This longer time to secure a buyer, coupled with higher property stocks, suggest that it will be more of a buyers’ market in the second half of 2019.

Shipside notes: “Growing numbers of properties on agents’ books even though fewer properties are coming up for sale are evidence of a more challenging market, with more sellers competing to get their transaction over the line. 

“With activity and prices often weaker in the second half of the year, it will be those sellers who are bold enough to price aggressively who will attract buyers with the confidence to act rather than hesitate. It would appear to be sellers in the upper end of the market who need to be boldest on pricing, as data shows that the middle and lower sectors are holding up better.”

Rightmove also quotes the widely respected Lucian Cook, head of residential research at Savills, who says: “Since the Brexit vote, the market has become driven by sentiment far more than the traditional economic drivers of affordability. That said, 2016 also coincided with the markets of London and the higher value parts of the South East hitting up against the limits of more regulation. 

“As a consequence the slowdown has, to date, been most evident in that part of the country. There are early indications that this ripple of caution, that is constraining price growth, is spreading more widely into some of the markets further north.  

“Protracted political hiatus has added to the sense of caution over the prospects for household finances, even though mortgage debt remains cheap.”

Cook continues: “Selling in the current market requires a healthy dose of pragmatism, which is reflected in a decline in asking prices. Where that has been taken on board, stock has continued to trade. That presents opportunities for those looking to trade up the ladder, though they need to be as realistic about the value of their own property as about the one that they want to purchase.”

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